Urine fertilizer: ‘Aging’ effectively protects against transfer of antibiotic resistance

  03 February 2020

Recycled and aged human urine can be used as a fertilizer with low risks of transferring antibiotic resistant DNA to the environment, according to new research from the University of Michigan.

It’s a key finding in efforts to identify more sustainable alternatives to widely used fertilizers that contribute to water pollution. Their high levels of nitrogen and phosphorus can spur the growth of algae, which can threaten our sources of drinking water.

Urine contains nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium — key nutrients that plants need to grow. Today, municipal treatment systems don’t totally remove these nutrients from wastewater before it’s released into rivers and streams. At the same time, manufacturing synthetic fertilizer is expensive and energy intensive.

Further reading: Science Daily
Author(s): University of Michigan
Clean Environment  
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