Safe thresholds for antibiotics in sewage needed to help combat antibiotic resistance

  09 September 2020

New research reveals current understanding of safe antibiotic levels in rivers may not prevent evolution of antibiotic resistance and fully protect human health. The study suggests the need to introduce thresholds to help fight the spread of resistant bacteria.

Around 70 percent of the antibiotics we take as medicine end up in the natural environment, through flushed waste and discarded medicines, among other sources. These antibiotics interact with bacteria that are also present in the water, which can evolve resistance within these environments. The bacteria can then transfer resistance to human-associated bacteria, meaning antibiotics are less likely to work.

Further reading: PhysOrg
Author(s): University of Exeter
Clean Environment  
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