No Change in Risk for Antibiotic-Resistant Salmonellosis From Beef, United States, 2002–2010

  17 September 2020

Restricting antibiotic use in food production animals is a target for reducing antimicrobial drug–resistant infections in humans. We used US surveillance data to estimate the probability of antibiotic-resistant nontyphoidal salmonellosis per meal made with beef during 2002–2010. Applying data for nontyphoidal Salmonella in raised-without-antibiotics cattle, we tested the effect of removing antibiotic use from all beef cattle production. We found an average of 1.2 (95% credible interval 0.6–4.2) antibiotic-resistant nontyphoidal salmonellosis cases per 1 million beef meals made with beef initially contaminated with antibiotic-resistant nontyphoidal Salmonella at slaughter or retail and 0.031 (95% credible interval 0.00018–0.14) cases per 1 million meals irrespective of beef contamination status. 

 

Further reading: MedScape
Author(s): Solenne Costard; Jane G. Pouzou; Keith E. Belk; Paul S. Morley; John W. Schmidt; Tommy L. Wheeler; Terrance M. Arthur; Francisco J. Zagmutt
Healthy Animals   Secure Foods  
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AMR Innovation Mission UK 2021

 

The AMR Innovation Mission UK 2021 aims to add to the global curbing of AMR by boosting joint early & translational research, R&D, clinical development,  validation, registration and commercialisation of vaccines, microbial diagnostics and antimicrobial products.

 

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