Antibiotic-resistance in Tanzania is an environmental problem

  03 February 2020

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are prevalent in people, wildlife and the water in northeastern Tanzania, but it’s not antibiotic use alone driving resistance. Instead, researchers at Washington State University found transmission of bacteria in the environment is the most important factor.

These conclusions come from a four-year study led by researchers from WSU’s Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health. The results of the study were just published in Nature Communications.

“We were surprised to find these microbes everywhere,” said Douglas Call, a Regents professor and associate director for research at the Allen School, “but it appears that within impoverished communities, there are many opportunities for bacteria to spread between animals and people via contact with waste or through consumption of contaminated food and water.”

The study, funded by the National Science Foundation, began in March 2012 and involved visiting 425 households from 13 villages throughout northeastern Tanzania.

Further reading: Science Daily
Author(s): Washington State University
Clean Environment  
Back


Boosting innovation in AMR?

15 OCT 2020: online Kick Off event AMR Innovation Mission UK 2021

 

The AMR Innovation Mission UK 2020/2021 aims to add to the global curbing of AMR by boosting joint early & translational research, R&D, clinical development,  validation, registration and commercialisation of vaccines, microbial diagnostics and antimicrobial products.

 

Register today >>
What is going on with AMR?
Stay tuned with remarkable global AMR news and developments!