UNIVERSITY PROJECT SAVING MOTHERS’ LIVES IN UGANDA

  04 April 2020

A team from the University of Salford has returned from a trip to Uganda, which saw them make great progress in tackling antimicrobial resistance (AMR), significantly reducing death rates for new mums in hospital.

Louise Ackers, Chair in Social Policy, and Clare Liptrott, Senior Lecturer in Non-Medical Prescribing, were among those who took part in the project – which aims to promote the safe use of antibiotics, working with the Commonwealth Partnerships for Antimicrobial Stewardship Scheme (THET Partnership for Global Health) and in line with the World Health Organisation (WHO).

AMR is where bacteria becomes resistant to antibiotics, creating a ‘super strain’ of resistant bacteria which can spread and become dangerous. This can be caused by people using antibiotics when they don’t need to.

Further reading: University of Salford
Author(s): University of Salford
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