Resistance to critically important antimicrobials in Australian silver gulls (Chroicocephalus novaehollandiae) and evidence of anthropogenic origins

  22 July 2019

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) to critically important antimicrobials (CIAs) amongst Gram-negative bacteria can feasibly be transferred amongst wildlife, humans and domestic animals. This study investigated the ecology, epidemiology and origins of CIA-resistant Escherichia coli carried by Australian silver gulls (Chroicocephalus novaehollandiae), a gregarious avian wildlife species that is a common inhabitant of coastal areas with high levels of human contact.

Author(s): Shewli Mukerji, Marc Stegger, Alec Vincent Truswell, Tanya Laird, David Jordan, Rebecca Jane Abraham, Ali Harb, Mary Barton, Mark O’Dea, Sam Abraham
Effective Surveillance   Healthy Animals  
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