Bacterial and fungal co-infection in individuals with coronavirus: A rapid review to support COVID-19 antimicrobial prescribing

  18 May 2020

To explore and describe the current literature surrounding bacterial/fungal co-infection in patients with coronavirus infection.

MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Web of Science were searched using broad based search criteria relating to coronavirus and bacterial co-infection. Articles presenting clinical data for patients with coronavirus infection (defined as SARS-1, MERS, SARS-COV-2, and other coronavirus) and bacterial/fungal co-infection reported in English, Mandarin, or Italian were included. Data describing bacterial/fungal co-infections, treatments, and outcomes were extracted. Secondary analysis of studies reporting antimicrobial prescribing in SARS-COV-2 even in the absence of co-infection was performed.

1007 abstracts were identified. Eighteen full texts reported bacterial/fungal co-infection were included. Most studies did not identify or report bacterial/fungal coinfection (85/140;61%). 9/18 (50%) studies reported on COVID-19, 5/18 (28%) SARS-1, 1/18 (6%) MERS, and 3/18 (17%) other coronavirus.

For COVID-19, 62/806 (8%) patients were reported as experiencing bacterial/fungal co-infection during hospital admission. Secondary analysis demonstrated wide use of broad-spectrum antibacterials, despite a paucity of evidence for bacterial coinfection. On secondary analysis, 1450/2010 (72%) of patients reported received antimicrobial therapy. No antimicrobial stewardship interventions were described.

For non-COVID-19 cases bacterial/fungal co-infection was reported in 89/815 (11%) of patients. Broad-spectrum antibiotic use was reported.

Despite frequent prescription of broad-spectrum empirical antimicrobials in patients with coronavirus associated respiratory infections, there is a paucity of data to support the association with respiratory bacterial/fungal co-infection. Generation of prospective evidence to support development of antimicrobial policy and appropriate stewardship interventions specific for the COVID-19 pandemic are urgently required.

 
Author(s): Timothy M Rawson, Luke S P Moore, Nina Zhu, Nishanthy Ranganathan, Keira Skolimowska, Mark Gilchrist, Giovanni Satta, Graham Cooke, Alison Holmes
Effective Surveillance  
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