Train the Trainer: Capacity building for genomic surveillance of AMR in low- and middle-income countries

06/10/2019 - 11/10/2019
Cambridge (UK)
Wellcome Genome Campus

In collaboration with the NIHR Global Health Research Unit on Genomic Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance (Centre for Genomic Pathogen Surveillance, Wellcome Sanger Institute, UK), we are pleased to announce this new course Train the Trainer: Capacity building for genomic surveillance of AMR in Low and Middle Income Countries

The increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistance threatens healthcare at every level and is now a major international threat to public health. Training and capacity building in whole genome sequencing (WGS) and its interpretation (bioinformatics) to provide rapid detection and assessment of newly emerging antibiotic resistant bacteria in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is crucial; as is equipping regional public health scientists and programmes with the tools and techniques to be able to transfer these skills within their own countries.

This new train-the-trainer course aims to develop a cohort of instructors that can deliver onward training in the use of genomic technologies for the surveillance of AMR. Trainers will be equipped with the skill sets to establish and build capacity in:

  1. Laboratory workflows – AST testing and DNA extraction for genomic sequencing
  2. Data flow and bioinformatic analyses for sequence data, including resistance prediction and linking epidemiological data (outbreak analyses and global context)
  3. Quality Assurance – internal and external testing for both laboratory and bioinformatics

The course is designed around surveillance of the current WHO bug-drug priority pathogens for the development of new antibiotics. Participants will enhance their current skill sets with teaching methodologies to train others and to enable the establishment of capacity and expertise in their own laboratory settings.This will be achieved through a combination of specialised, hands-on training along with pedagogical theory to enable participants to effectively teach these skills to a mixed audience (e.g. lab-based, epidemiologists, computer scientists, etc.) as part of either new or existing genomic surveillance programmes in their home countries.

Target audience
The course is aimed at bioinformaticians and laboratory scientists based in national, regional and local laboratories and regional surveillance centres in LMICs. Applicants should have existing experience of WGS laboratory techniques or WGS data analysis methods, together with a strong interest in, and opportunities for, training others in these skills.

There is no course fee and limited bursaries are available to cover travel expenses. All accommodation and meals will be provided free of charge at the Wellcome Genome Campus for the duration of the course.

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